The 4th Wonderful Grace Kelly Blogathon: Dial M for Murder (1954)

banner-5Virginie at The Wonderful World of Cinema and Emily at The Flapper Dame are hosting The 4th Wonderful Grace Kelly Blogathon to honour Grace Kelly, the icon of beauty and elegance. She was an outstanding actress, who worked most notably with Alfred Hitchcock (see Rear Window (1954) and To Catch a Thief (1955)). In Dial M for Murder, Kelly is Margot Wendice, the wealthy wife of an ex professional tennis player Tony Wendice, played by Ray Milland. She is to become the centre of the plot whereby the husband hires a hitman to kill the wife. Kelly’s character (that wonderful lady in red, and then in blue) comes off as a beautiful, brave and stoic woman who wants personal happiness, and would have stolen the show completely if not for the intricate, clever and psychologically-interesting plot, and the cunning personality of Tony Wendice, played brilliantly by Milland.  

Dial M for MurderDial M for Murder [1954] – ★★★★

You know you are in for a treat when a film you are about to see is made by Alfred Hitchcock. This time around, the director is basing his film on a screenplay by Frederick Knott and is concerned with the proving of guilt, rather than with the usual “whodunit” mystery. Dial M for Murder starts with the blackmail and the deceit by the wife of her husband, but it ends in an unexpected area. The interesting thing about this film is that we know from the beginning who is the (attempted) murderer, and we follow every step to the conclusion, but we are still in for some surprises. Initially, that is because the murder of Margot, as planned by her husband Tony, does not exactly go according to plan. Continue reading “The 4th Wonderful Grace Kelly Blogathon: Dial M for Murder (1954)”

“The Lost Weekend” Review

the-lost-weekend-posterThe Lost Weekend [1945] – ★★★★★

“One drink’s too many, and a hundred’s not enough.”

The Lost Weekend is a 1945 film directed by Billy Wilder, and telling a story of a failed writer Don Birnam (Ray Milland) who struggles to combat his chronic alcohol addiction in the course of a weekend. The winner of an Academy Award in the categories of Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor and Best Adapted Screenplay, The Lost Weekend is now deemed so significant both culturally and historically, it has been recently added in that category to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Indeed, more than 70 years after its initial release, the movie still mesmerises the audience with its performances, and paints probably the most heartfelt and realistic picture of someone combating their alcohol addiction.  Continue reading ““The Lost Weekend” Review”